Don't let them tame you

A collection of thoughts and pretty things.


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Reblogged from effiearts

(Source: effiearts, via femifeisty)

Reblogged from jessbennett
jessbennett:

Tiger head beach girl: 1968
via retronaut

jessbennett:

Tiger head beach girl: 1968

via retronaut

Reblogged from dimepiecela

Reblogged from giraffeinatree
giraffeinatree:

Yellow-throated Marten (Martes flavigula), East Asia
photo by Markus Söhlmann

giraffeinatree:

Yellow-throated Marten (Martes flavigula), East Asia

photo by Markus Söhlmann

(via rhamphotheca)

Reblogged from psych-facts

In fact a mature person does not fall in love, he rises in love. The word ’fall’ is not right. Only immature people fall; they stumble and fall down in love. Somehow they were managing and standing. They cannot manage and they cannot stand – they find a woman and they are gone, they find a man and they are gone. They were always ready to fall on the ground and to creep. They don’t have the backbone, the spine; they don’t have that integrity to stand alone.

A mature person has the integrity to be alone. And when a mature person gives love, he gives without any strings attached to it: he simply gives. And when a mature person gives love, he feels grateful that you have accepted his love, not vice versa. He does not expect you to be thankful for it – no, not at all, he does not even need your thanks. He thanks you for accepting his love. And when two mature persons are in love, one of the greatest paradoxes of life happens, one of the most beautiful phenomena: they are together and yet tremendously alone; they are together so much so that they are almost one. But their oneness does not destroy their individuality, in fact, it enhances it: they become more individual.


Two mature persons in love help each other to become more free. There is no politics involved, no diplomacy, no effort to dominate. How can you dominate the person you love? Just think over it. Domination is a sort of hatred, anger, enmity. How can you think of dominating a person you love? You would love to see the person totally free, independent; you will give him more individuality. That’s why I call it the greatest paradox: they are together so much so that they are almost one, but still in that oneness they are individuals. Their individualities are not effaced – they have become more enhanced. The other has enriched them as far as their freedom is concerned.


Immature people falling in love destroy each other’s freedom, create a bondage, make a prison. Mature persons in love help each other to be free; they help each other to destroy all sorts of bondages. And when love flows with freedom there is beauty. When love flows with dependence there is ugliness.

Osho (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: psych-facts, via adore-theworld)

Reblogged from digg
Reblogged from tigerandpilgrim
Reblogged from personifyingchaos

personifyingchaos:

Dylan Moran on adulthood

(via piercingsandink)

Reblogged from pornobw

(Source: pornobw, via piercingsandink)

Reblogged from 4gifs
rhapsodybrohemian:

This is it. This is the post that made me laugh out loud. This is pretty accurate.

rhapsodybrohemian:

This is it. This is the post that made me laugh out loud. This is pretty accurate.

(via itsfuckingfriday)

Reblogged from micropolisnyc
micropolisnyc:

Tough love from Shonda Rhimes to the Dartmouth Class of 2014. In her commencement speech, she addresses the myth of “having it all” but also the great rewards of being a successful woman who is also a devoted mother…

Shonda, how do you do it all?
The answer is this: I don’t.
Whenever you see me somewhere succeeding in one area of my life, that almost certainly means I am failing in another area of my life.
If I am killing it on a Scandal script for work, I am probably missing bath and story time at home. If I am at home sewing my kids’ Halloween costumes, I’m probably blowing off a rewrite I was supposed to turn in. If I am accepting a prestigious award, I am missing my baby’s first swim lesson. If I am at my daughter’s debut in her school musical, I am missing Sandra Oh’s last scene ever being filmed at Grey’s Anatomy. If I am succeeding at one, I am inevitably failing at the other. That is the tradeoff. That is the Faustian bargain one makes with the devil that comes with being a powerful working woman who is also a powerful mother. You never feel a hundred percent OK; you never get your sea legs; you are always a little nauseous. Something is always lost.
Something is always missing.
And yet. I want my daughters to see me and know me as a woman who works. I want that example set for them. I like how proud they are when they come to my offices and know that they come to Shondaland. There is a land and it is named after their mother. In their world, mothers run companies. In their world, mothers own Thursday nights. In their world, mothers work. And I am a better mother for it. The woman I am because I get to run Shondaland, because I get to write all day, because I get to spend my days making things up, that woman is a better person—and a better mother. Because that woman is happy. That woman is fulfilled. That woman is whole. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who didn’t get to do this all day long. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who wasn’t doing.

Watch her full speech and read the transcript here.

micropolisnyc:

Tough love from Shonda Rhimes to the Dartmouth Class of 2014. In her commencement speech, she addresses the myth of “having it all” but also the great rewards of being a successful woman who is also a devoted mother…

Shonda, how do you do it all?

The answer is this: I don’t.

Whenever you see me somewhere succeeding in one area of my life, that almost certainly means I am failing in another area of my life.

If I am killing it on a Scandal script for work, I am probably missing bath and story time at home. If I am at home sewing my kids’ Halloween costumes, I’m probably blowing off a rewrite I was supposed to turn in. If I am accepting a prestigious award, I am missing my baby’s first swim lesson. If I am at my daughter’s debut in her school musical, I am missing Sandra Oh’s last scene ever being filmed at Grey’s Anatomy. If I am succeeding at one, I am inevitably failing at the other. That is the tradeoff. That is the Faustian bargain one makes with the devil that comes with being a powerful working woman who is also a powerful mother. You never feel a hundred percent OK; you never get your sea legs; you are always a little nauseous. Something is always lost.

Something is always missing.

And yet. I want my daughters to see me and know me as a woman who works. I want that example set for them. I like how proud they are when they come to my offices and know that they come to Shondaland. There is a land and it is named after their mother. In their world, mothers run companies. In their world, mothers own Thursday nights. In their world, mothers work. And I am a better mother for it. The woman I am because I get to run Shondaland, because I get to write all day, because I get to spend my days making things up, that woman is a better person—and a better mother. Because that woman is happy. That woman is fulfilled. That woman is whole. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who didn’t get to do this all day long. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who wasn’t doing.

Watch her full speech and read the transcript here.

Reblogged from hoodjab
I love all the right people but I’m the wrong person. Describe your self in ten words.  (via lions—teeth)

(Source: hoodjab, via lions--teeth)

Reblogged from emotional-algebra
Of course I am not worried about intimidating men. The type of man who will be intimidated by me is exactly the type of man I have no interest in. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie  (via insatiabletresses)

(Source: emotional-algebra, via adore-theworld)

Reblogged from nylonpinksy
I give a fuck. I give lots of fucks, actually. I’m a prostitute of feelings. (via ileu)

(Source: nylonpinksy, via lions--teeth)

Reblogged from bethanwi

(Source: bethanwi, via iremember2forget)